Skip to content

Ha ha! Federal nutrition guidelines wrong again! Whole milk and dairy products are good for you

October 8, 2015

From my latest blog post for the Independent Women’s Forum:

Some of my favorite things

A few months ago eggs became OK again, when the U.S. Department of Agriculture issued new dietary guidelines reversing decades of official alarm over the dangers of a traditional farm breakfast. Studies have shown that the 50-year-old  vaunted link between eating cholesterol-rich foods and high levels of blood cholesterol doesn’t really exist.

Now, it appears that  avoiding whole milk–a dietary guideline still promoted by the government–may be a mistake as well. The Washington Post reports:

“U.S. dietary guidelines have long recommended that people steer clear of whole milk, and for decades, Americans have obeyed. Whole milk sales shrunk. It was banned from school lunch programs. Purchases of low-fat dairy climbed.

“’Replace whole milk and full-fat milk products with fat-free or low-fat choices,’ says the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the federal government’s influential advice book, citing the role of dairy fat in heart disease.

“Whether this massive shift in eating habits has made anyone healthier is an open question among scientists, however. In fact, research published in recent years indicates that the opposite might be true: millions might have been better off had they stuck with whole milk.

“Scientists who tallied diet and health records for several thousand patients over ten years found, for example, that contrary to the government advice, people who consumed more milk fat had lower incidence of heart disease.”

Whole milk is currently banned from childhood-obesity-phobic school-lunch menus–even though a 2013 study revealed that kids who drink it are on the whole slimmer than kids who drink low-fat milk, (probably because the fattier milk is more filling and doesn’t have to be disguised with chocolate to make it more appealing). So parents who declined to follow the American Academy of Pediatrics’ advice to switch their toddlers to 2 percent milk seem to be vindicated.

Read my whole piece here.

Posted by Charlotte Allen

Advertisements

From → Uncategorized

Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: