Skip to content

Annals of female oppression: Disney princesses not allowed to yackety-yack enough

February 1, 2016

From my latest blog post for the Independent Women’s Forum:

Pocahantas: Princess Only 24 Percent of Lines

From Mashable:

“Data linguists Carmen Fought and Karen Eisenhauer analyzed all dialogue in Disney princess films and found that men have three times as many lines as female characters. This trend started with the Little Mermaid, where men speak 68% of the time. The statistics carry on well into the ’90s from there, with men speaking 71% of the time in Beauty and the Beast, 76% of the time in Pocahontas and 77% of the time in Mulan.

“Even with the newer films, the balance is still off.

“Women speak less than 50% of the time in 2009’s Princess and the Frog and 2013’s Frozen. Brave and Tangled break that streak, with women getting 52% and 74% of lines respectively, though they appear to be exceptions to the rule.”

And if that weren’t bad enough:

‘In addition, the characters are usually surrounded by men, Fought and Eisenhauer note.

“’There’s one isolated princess trying to get someone to marry her, but there are no women doing any other things,’ Fought tells the Post. ‘There are no women leading the townspeople to go against the Beast, no women bonding in the tavern together singing drinking songs, women giving each other directions, or women inventing things. Everybody who’s doing anything else, other than finding a husband in the movie, pretty much, is a male.’

‘Their data shows that since Snow White in 1937, pretty much every Disney princess film has a mostly male cast. Aside from princes and villains, the sidekick/best friend character is typically also always male. For example Mushu (Mulan), Flounder (The Little Mermaid), Genie (Aladdin), Olaf (Frozen) and more.”

Well, maybe we could remake Snow White to include Grumpette, Doperina, and Sneezyella. And isn’t Flounder a fish?

Read the whole thing here.

Posted by Charlotte Allen
Advertisements

From → Uncategorized

Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: